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Competitions

Competitions are a huge part of the gloving community. Since it's inception back in '09, Competitive Gloving has defined the generations of light shows each and every time someone steps in the ring. From then to now, we've seen a huge advancement in not just the moves, but the structures of each tournament. Glovers compete so much now that it's moved from just the physical in-store competitions to online competitions run by community leaders, such as FABLE, and GMO.

Running a tournament on your own is easy. Here are some of the things you need to know.

 

How to Run the Competition
There are a few people that you need that will help you run things smoothly
  • Head Judge:
    • This will be your main organizer. They are in charge of managing your judges, as well as making final calls on match debates. They should have past experience as a judge & be able to manage a group of people. This person should also be helping collect scorecards from all the judges (All scorecards should be turned in to the Head Judge at the end of each round, who can pass them off to someone else who can record the scores.)
  • Check-In Person / General Assistant :
    • Have one person to help organize the scorecards, collecting them from the head judge after each round for safe keeping. They should also help with miscellaneous things like getting judges food & water, etc.
  • Judges
    • You should be ready to have at least 1 judge per match (2 for Finals however is best, since those are usually harder to judge and "more important")

-> You need this scorecard <-

    • The scorecard is what you will use to score each show, and determine a winner. It judges a lightshow based on 9 unique categories. 
    • For a full breakdown of what they are, and how to use the scorecard, check out The 2017 Scorecard Overview, Here.

Supplies

  • Here's a quick list of all the things we usually bring to competitions
    (If you don't have some of it, no worries, It's 100% possible to run a tournament without these. It would make life easy, but you can make do without it.)

  • Set Up the Floor
    • Give people places to compete. EL usually puts down tape to create small boxes for people to sit in, but you can use anythiing you want, or nothJust try and keep people separated while they compete

You Need Music

  • You can use 1 DJ for the entirety of the competition (4-6 Hours depending on size of competitor list)
  • We pick the music by genre for each round (If Competitior #1 gets Dubstep, Competitor #2 should have a different song from the same genre)
  • Have the DJ chop up the tracks in 1:30 sections, usually starting exactly 30 seconds from the Drop, and then just have them play/pause the tracks during the competition. This way every competitor has a fair chance while they perform, with even track formats and no surprises
  • NOTE- 1:30 for normal rounds. 2:00 for finals (top 4), the tracks should all be cued according to those times. The reason why Finals are a little longer is to add pressure to the performers to put out even more than they did before, and to make it more exciting.
  • You can check out previous official BOSS Music playlists, here.

Video

  • Have someone with a camera get coverage of each match. Try to get someone with a full DSLR camera that can shoot in 1080p. (iPhone 6s or even a GoPro is a safe low cost alternative if no other real options are available ).  
  • If you provide videos to EL, we may post it to our social & promote your event/venue/company.

 Click Here for 4.3 "Club Glove" ->

Written By: Alex (Cypher) 
Last Updated: 2/8/2016